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The Death Of Cinema And My Father Too

The Death Of Cinema And My Father Too

Original Name: The Death Of Cinema And My Father Too
English Name: The Death Of Cinema And My Father Too
Year: 2020
Run Time: 100 min
Language: Hebrew
Type (Colour/ Black & white) : Colour
Country: Israel
Director: Dani Rosenberg
Producer: Stav Morag Meron, Dani Rosenberg, Carol Polakoff
Cast: Marek Rozenbaum, Roni Kuban, Ina Rosenberg, Noa Koler, Natan Rosenberg, Sabina Rosenberg, Ruth Farhi, Uri Klauzne
Screenplay: Dani Rosenberg, Itay Kohay
Cinematographer: David Stragmeister
Editor: Nili Feller, Guy Nemesh
Sound Designer: Neal Gibs
Music Composer: Yuval Semo
Costume Designer: Rachel Ben Dahan
Production Designer: Vera Grinblat
Production Company: Pardes Films
World Sales: Films Boutique
World Sales Phone: +49 30 69 53 78 50
World Sales Email:contact@filmsboutique.com

Festivals:

  • Cannes 2020

Director’s Selected Filmography :

  • 2005 Don Quixote in Jerusalem - Short
  • 2004 The Red Toy - Short
  • 2003 Border Project - Short

Director’s Biography:

Dani Rosenberg

Dani Rosenberg is a director and writer who graduated from Sam Spiegel Film School-Jerusalem. His award winning short films have been screened in dozens of international film festivals, including Cannes Cinéfondation Competition (Fence, part of the Border Project), Berlinale International Short Competition (Susya and Don Quixote in Jerusalem), Clermond-Ferrand, Oberhausen and Fipa-Biarritz (The Red Toy) , HotDocs and IDFA (Susya). He’s also created acclaimed television series (Queens and Milk & Honey which was adapted by Germany and purchased by Channel 4), co-created a documentary (Zohar, The Return), and most recently adapted God of Vengeance for Israel’s leading theater The Cameri. The Death of Cinema and my Father Too is his first feature film.

Synopsis:

A father and son try to freeze time through cinema. While the father is unsentimental in his approach toward his last days, his son disconnects from reality in a desperate attempt to see his father as a hero. Although in the fictional story, Tel Aviv goes up in flames the father’s real world does not end with a bang but a slow vanishing whimper.